Mountain Spiraea. Subalpine spiraea is also known as rosy spirea, or rose or mountain meadowsweet. It grows at elevations between 2,000 and 11,000 feet on inland mountain ranges.

Mountain Spiraea Photos, Diagrams & Topos SummitPost
Mountain Spiraea Photos, Diagrams & Topos SummitPost from www.summitpost.org

Subalpine spiraea is also known as rosy spirea, or rose or mountain meadowsweet. Hardy to usda zone 3? More heat tolerant than standard pieris japonica, mountain snow offers interest in the garden with both foliage and showy blooms.

In The Fall, The Leaves Warm Up To Glowing Orange, Red And Purple Shades, Adding Sparkle To The Late Season.

It grows at elevations between 2,000 and 11,000 feet on inland mountain ranges. This plant grows natively in the foothills. Flowers late summer when nothing else is even green but the vacationers show up for the last trip in august.

The Current Accepted Name For This Plant Is.

The plant is adapted to cold, moist, rocky slopes. The small, green, serrated leaves turn orange, gold, red, purple, or yellow in fall. Good for ornamental gardens and rain gardens.

Later, The Color Changes To Chartreuse, Which Is Less Exciting.

It grows at elevations between 2,000 and 11,000 feet on inland mountain ranges. It is found on the west coast of north america from california to british columbia. However, snowmound tends to be a bit smaller with a 2 to 4 foot height.

The Tan Fruit Persists Through Winter.

Browse pictures and read growth / cultivation information about rock spiraea, cliff spiraea, mountain spray (holodiscus dumosus) supplied by member gardeners in. It is commonly found at elevations between 2,000 and 11,000 feet on inland mountain ranges. Noted for its bright pink flowers, spiraea splendens (rose meadowsweet) is a woody deciduous shrub bearing glabrous to finely hairy stems clad with alternate, ovate to elliptical, bright green leaves.

As Winter Approaches The Leaves Will Turn To A Nice Golden Yellow And Eventually Drop.

Gold mound spirea's foliage is best at two times of the year: While it has some summer interest in small white flowers, the real highlight is the show this shrub puts on during the fall with purple, orange, and red shades.early spiraea (spiraea thunbergii): Native from 2000 feet to 11,000 feet, from the central sierra nevada to b.c.

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